Umpiring Rules and Updates

Umpire Guidelines - 2018 Season

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Playing without Goalkeepers

The LGSHA rules regarding Goal Keepers (or player with goal keeping privileges) is aligned with Hockey WA (Junior League and Provisional & Metropolitan League Rules).

The FIH Rule that allows teams to play without a goalkeeper does not apply to any Hockey WA Competition.

Junior Grades (MP, UP, LHS & U18)

NO GOALIE = NO GAME!

Each team must play with a goalkeeper with goalkeeping privileges wearing full protective equipment comprised of at least protective headgear (full goalkeeping helmet, not just a mask), leg guards and kickers and a different coloured shirt

Senior Grades (MA, WA, MB, WB)

NO HELMET = NO GAME!

Each team must play with either:

  • a goalkeeper with goalkeeping privileges wearing full protective equipment comprised of at least protective headgear (full goalkeeping helmet, not just a mask), leg guards and kickers and a different coloured shirt; or
  • a goalkeeper with goalkeeping privileges wearing only protective headgear (full goalkeeping helmet, not just a mask) and a different coloured shirt.

FOR THE FULL INFORMATION DOWNLOAD THE GOALKEEPING PDF BELOW.

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Stuff That Happens At The Wrong Time!!

1. Umpire blows the whistle for PC and the ball ends up in the goal

We’ve all been in this situation haven’t we!! You are about to crack the dream goal of the century but the umpire calls PC for the little foot off the defender.....OR .... the ball did end up in the goal immediately after the whistle went.

The right decision?? = No Goal: The PC must be played. Yes... correct use of “advantage” would have resulted in the goal but as an umpire you have to admit your mistake and play the PC. Umpires need to manage this situation by being calm, apologetic and clearly communicate why the PC has to stand 

2. Goals or PC just before siren (or was it actually after??)

What happens when the siren/time goes just before the umpire would have made a decision?? (Basically something happens and the umpire hasn’t had a chance to get the whistle to the mouth to blow the whistle.)

FIH’s guidance is that the umpire is permitted to make that decision immediately after the end of the half or match. Examples include;

  1. A PC, PS (stroke) or even a personal penalty (eg green/yellow card) can be awarded for an offence that occurs immediately before the siren goes
  2. A goal can be awarded provided the BALL has crossed the line BEFORE the siren
  3. A goal cannot be awarded if the ball has been struck by an attacker and is “in transit” but has not crossed the line when the siren goes.


Playing the Ball above the Shoulder

As outlined earlier in the year, players are not allowed to play the ball above shoulder height (other than saving a shot directly at goal). The tournament rule that we have seen at recent international events such as World Cup and Commonwealth Games DOES NOT apply to Hockey WA general competitions.

If your intent is to play the ball (even if you miss) high above your shoulder, then it shall be seen as trying to break down the play and should result in a Yellow Card personal penalty.

Defenders or goalkeepers ARE permitted to use the stick to stop or deflect the ball at any height. This does not mean they can whack it away as a genuine hit above shoulder height to prevent a goal should result in a penalty stroke.


Position of Umpires on the Field

During the season I have noted quite a difference in the effort made umpires when it comes to position on the field. It varies from quite poor with decisions in the circle being made from out near the 25m line to much better when the umpire is on the back line with great vision of the real action.

I saw a good example recently with a defender making a lunging save to attempt to clear the ball that had got past the keeper and heading directly into the goal mouth. It initially looked like it had been successful, however the umpire was perfectly positioned near the back line to see the ball had actually crossed the line and a goal awarded.

There was a couple of grumbles from the defenders but not from the one involved whose body language suggested they knew the right decision had been made. There is no way this sort of decision could have been made correctly (with confidence and not guessing) from any other position.


Dangerous Play

Raised Stick

Dangerous play from a raised stick or ball can be a tough one to call. At the end of the day it boils down to our 3 key goals for the Junior Panel.

Keep it Safe, Keep it Simple & Keep it Fun

I think we can all be a little stronger on the raised stick particularly in BUP. My observation of the grade is there is a large gap between the stronger and weaker players. The stronger boys are probably taking a bit of an advantage of the situation in their attacking circle and giving a real wind up and chucking the kitchen sink at the ball to smash it at the goal.

Pay careful attention to the following;

  1. Intimidation: When an attacking player acts like he is going to wind up and hit it hard, the defender backs off/turns away, jumps etc... then the attacker then does a sneaky dribble past him. 
    ACTION: Blow free hit to the defender
  2. Raised Stick with players reasonably close: This is usually in or around the circle (can be attackers or defenders). Usually a shot on goal or a desperate clearance by a full back. If it looks a bit dangerous..... then it is dangerous and a free hit awarded.
    ACTION: Blow free hit immediately...even if the player hasn’t had a chance to hit it yet. As soon as the stick gets up high with players close then blow whistle. Always go for safety first.
  3. Raised Stick with no one around: This is usually the full back taking a 16 having a big wind up. This not exactly pretty hockey... but it’s not dangerous (as long as the players are at least 5m away)
    ACTION: Let the play continue but remind the player that his stick is pretty high and you will call it dangerous if he does it again when players are closer.
  4. Raised Ball: Remember the guidelines from the booklet (or go to the umpire page on the LGSHA web site).
    ACTION: For UP if the ball is raised (above knee knee height) in general play and not within playing distance of anyone then play continues. If it goes anywhere near a player (regardless of the speed) then it is dangerous.

All free hits must be kept below knee height regardless of danger.

In MP, the ball must be kept below shin pad height (remember these guys have little legs so the height is pretty low!!). Use discretion if a gentle raised ball goes nowhere near any players.

  1. 5. Manage the situation
  • a) Always remain calm
  • b) Communicate regularly with any player or the teams who you think may be “on the edge” of playing dangerously. Let them know early ... “Keep Your Sticks Down!!” or “Keep it Safe Guys!!”
  • c) Don’t be afraid to let the coach know that player XX needs to keep his/her stick down.
  • d) Always be in control of the game... don’t let it “get away from you”. We have all played in games where the 1st danger play is followed by a 2nd more dangerous play and so on and then someone gets hurt. This can be avoided with good umpiring.
  • e) If a player does get hurt STOP THE GAME IMMEDIATELY and call the coach onto the field


ONFIELD LANGUAGE

Audible swearing regardless of who it’s directed at (even themselves) is to be strongly discouraged. Audible swearing is deemed to be within earshot of any person on the field.

There have been some recent reported issues of on field swearing and bad language. In some instances, it has been directed at umpires. This has been taken very seriously by the committee and the presid...ent has been in contact with those involved.

A reminder to the LGSHA Players, Coaches & Officials Code of Conduct:

#14 – Refrain from using obscene, offensive or insulting language and/or making obscene gestures which may insult players, coaches, officials or spectators.

Recommended action for umpires is as follows;

  1. Any swearing/bad language towards an umpire should result in a minimum 10 minute Yellow Card and Code of Conduct Report
  2. Any swearing towards opposition should result in a minimum 5 min Yellow Card
  3. Any swearing at themselves (own frustration) should result in minimum 2 min Green Card
  4. All penalties can be upgraded if umpire deems the severity is necessary (such as loud “F” bombs regardless of who it is aimed at)

We are all familiar with the added tension that builds up on the field in finals so please be conscious of this and continue to play the game fairly with respect to the game, yourself, and all players, umpires and spectators.

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Umpire blows the whistle for PC and the ball ends up in the goal

We’ve all been in this situation haven’t we!! You are about to crack the dream goal of the century into but the umpire calls PC for the little foot off the defender.....OR .... the ball did end up in the goal immediately after the whistle went.

The right decision?? = No Goal: The Penalty Corner must be played. Yes... correct use of “advantage” would have resulted in the goal but as an umpire you have to admit your mistake and play the PC. Umpires need to manage this situation by being calm, apologetic and clearly communicate why the PC has to stand 

Goals or Penalty Corners just before siren (or was it actually after??)

What happens when the siren/time goes just before the umpire would have made a decision?? (Basically something happens and the umpire hasn’t had a chance to get the whistle to the mouth to blow before the siren sounds).

FIH’s guidance for this is that the umpire is permitted to make that decision immediately after the end of the half or match. Examples that may happen include;

1. A penalty corner, penalty stroke or even a personal penalty (eg green/yellow card) can be awarded for an offence that occurs immediately before the siren goes

2. A goal can be awarded provided the BALL has crossed the line BEFORE the siren

3. A goal cannot be awarded if the ball has been struck by an attacker and is “intransit” but has not crossed the line when the siren goes.

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CLARIFICATION: RAISED STICK ABOVE SHOULDER

The rule is played at International level and we have recently been asked by the AIS to introduce it into our top league as that is where the International players play and they train with the rule. We are still deliberating this move but if we did introduce it, it would be for the top grade only.

It is not a rule of hockey to be allowed to play the ball above the shoulder and is still not implemented here at any level.

Cheers

Fiona Stuart
Assistant Manager Club and Game Development
Hockey WA
Perth Hockey Stadium, Curtin University, Hayman Road, Bentley, WA 6102 Australia
T: +618 9351 4350 F: +618 9458 5524 W: www.hockeywa.org.au


Applying the Rule in LGSHA

Recommended guideline to apply a penalty for a player who plays the ball above their shoulder in LGSHA is;

Always consider 1st“Is the ball dangerous” then 2nd“What was the intent of the player”

Consider the following examples and action;

(i) Player attempts to play ball legally but just gets it a bit wrong on judgement – Free hit only

(ii) Player deliberately plays the ball wide and high of should in general play – careless and forgetful but at least a green card

(iii) Player deliberately plays the ball illegally to make sure an opposition player cant get the ball (breaking down the play) – yellow card every day!

(iv) Instinctive reaction to a high ball near the shoulder/head and considered a defensive action – sounds like a dangerous ball and normal danger rule applies

Hope this is helpful


Finals Umpiring – Keeping it simple, its just another game

We have a number of senior and experienced umpires who will (again) be volunteering their time and energy to help officiate the finals. Some of the key points and reminders for the umpires are;

  1. Match preparation – arrive nice and early and get ready, chat with co umpire and work out an understanding on how you will manage the game ahead.
  2. Remain calm & cool under pressure
  3. Set your standard early – make it clear early with strong decisions on poor tackles, 5m positions, acceptable time to set for a PC (don’t start calling time in the last minute just because a team is screaming for it if there has been no change for whole game!)
  4. Be consistent – apply the same rules that have been done all year for the whole 70 mins.
  5. Communicate & engage with the players – be clear with your calls, especially with advantage ad key decisions.
  6. Receptive – accept a polite question to clarify a particular decision such as a PC and provide a polite response, then get on with the game.
  7. Cooperation – with your co umpire to assist where necessary. Don’t hesitate to call time and discuss or clarify a key decision such as a PC.
  8. Acceptance – that occasional wrong decisions will be made. Don’t be afraid to correct if necessary. However, do not accept any abuse on the field.
  9. Captains – use the captains to help calm any heated or tension building situations. It is their responsibility for the conduct of the team (not the umpire).
  10. Position & Vision – basic position is critical, big calls cannot be made from miles away and mobility is the only way this can happen. Do not take eyes off the play (both umpires) especially during PC and goal scoring moments of the game.
  11. Professional – Correct shirt, clothing and equipment (including penalty cards)
  12. Enjoyment – it is a satisfying contribution to be able to umpire these finals

Finals Teams & Players – Don’t forget to enjoy the game!

Virtually the same message can apply to the finals teams. Keep it simple and don’t forget to enjoy the experience.

Players can help in the overall flow and enjoyment of the finals by managing their team to avoid things such as;

  1. Breaking down play (such as 5m infringement, stick high to stop overhead, hack tackles)
  2. Time wasting including penalty corners (umpires will call time if necessary)
  3. Position of free hits (inside 25m is to be very close to correct spot)
  4. Sliding and dangerous tackles (high risk and high penalty)
  5. Misconduct towards umpires or opposition (high risk and high penalty)

Captains are responsible for the conduct of their team on and off the field. They can be sent off for the actions of their team if the umpire deems it necessary. Hopefully we will have none of this happening.


Finals Tiebreakers

LGSHA Finals will be decided by the following process if scores are level at the end of normal time;

Further details regarding extra time and penalty stroke competition are available on the LGSHA web page.

MIDDLE PRIMARY

Semi & Preliminary Final

The team who finished higher on the ladder shall be deemed the winner.

Grand Final

The trophy is shared.

Time Keeping

Thetime clock shall not be stopped for any reason.

UPPER PRIMARY

Semi & Preliminary Final

Extra time “Golden Goal”. If no result - the team who finished higher on the ladder shall be deemed the winner.

Grand Final

Extra time “Golden Goal”. If no result - the trophy is shared.

Time Keeping

Thetime clock shall not be stopped for any reason.

LOWER HIGH SCHOOL & UNDER 18

Semi & Preliminary Final & Grand Final

Extra time “Golden Goal”. If no result, then penalty stokes

Time Keeping

Thetime clock shall only be stopped for injuries as directed by the umpires

MENS/WOMEN A & B GRADES

Semi & Preliminary Final & Grand Final

Extra time “Golden Goal”. If no result, then penalty stokes

Time Keeping

Thetime clock shall be stopped & started as directed by the umpires


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